eliza berkon is a features writer and musician based in washington d.c. 

9 Of Our Favorite Things To Do Around D.C. This Week

Summer is over (depending on who you ask), but with the departure of outdoor films and pool parties comes the welcome return of fall favorites such as football, sweater shopping, and that not-to-be-named but ubiquitous Starbucks latte. Get the post-Labor Day season going with a fresh take on Shakespeare, some trap yoga or a late-night tour of Hong Kong snacks.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4

BLUE FLOWERS: Iranian-born illustrator, animator, and musician Marjan Farsad brings the melancholy, delicate music heard on album Blue Flowers to D.C. for the first time. (Dupont Underground, 8 p.m., $35-$40)

OUT, DAMNED SPOT! Feel like you're always climbing to get to the top? You'll feel a whole lot better about your power-hungry self after watching famed Shakespearean tragedy Macbeth, which opens Folger Theatre's new season on Tuesday with a pay-what-you-can performance. This Restoration production is accompanied by period music performed by the Folger Consort. (Folger Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $42-$79)

KNOCK KNOCK: "Stay-at-home son" Allan Sidley hosts new stand-up series Comedy Night in Takoma, featuring the self-deprecating, deadpan humor of Wendy Wroblewski and several other mostly local comics. (Busboys and Poets, 7 p.m.-9 p.m., $10)

MORESummer in the City: First Tuesday Game Night (Smith Public Trust, 6 p.m.-8 p.m., FREE), Marcelo Rojas (Kennedy Center Millennium Stage, 6 p.m., FREE)

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

STAY INSIDE THE LINES: Explore a history of American illustration through the stories of women who contributed their talents to the field, despite industry challenges, in a discussion with Martha H. Kennedy, author of Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists. (Politics and Prose, 7 p.m.-8 p.m., FREE)

ONLY HAVE EYES FOR YOU: Documentary photographer Astrid Riecken points her camera at a single subject in the Samantha Series, on view at the Goethe-Institut. Riecken captures her partner, Samantha, in compositions that have a cinematic quality, whether set in train stations or cemeteries. (Goethe-Institut Washington, 6 p.m.-8 p.m., FREE)

STRIVING FOR PEACE: One of the most enduring images from then-President Bill Clinton's tenure in office is of Clinton looking on as Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin shakes hands with Palestinian Liberation Organization chairman Yasser Arafat on the day the Oslo I Accord was signed in 1993, laying out an ultimately ill-fated process for establishing peace in the Middle East. In The Oslo Diaries, part of the Washington Jewish Film Festival's ongoing film series, watch footage from some of the secretive discussions that led to the accords some 25 years ago. (E Street Cinema, 7:30 p.m., $13.50)

MORETrap Yoga (The Trinity Center, 6 p.m.-7 p.m., $15), Introduction to Western Art: From Cartouches to Constantine (S. Dillon Ripley Center, 6:45 p.m., $90-$140), State of Employment in Washington D.C. (One Judiciary Square, 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m., FREE)

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

TRAVEL FOR LESS: Can't afford a roundtrip ticket to Hong Kong? Shaw restaurant Tiger Fork has you covered. At its Hong Kong-Style Night Market, visit food stands (Did someone say Spam-fried rice?) and sip highballs with a DJ-provided soundtrack. (Tiger Fork, 10:30 p.m., Price varies with order)

ALL ROADS LEAD TO ...: Forbes magazine editor-in chief and former presidential candidateSteve Forbes joins historian John Prevas for a look at what contemporary lessons can be drawn from studying the arc of ancient empires. In Blueprints of Empire: Ancient Rome and America, Forbes and Prevas compare the two societies in an effort to find truths that might inform our future. (National Museum of Natural History, 6:45 p.m., $30-$45)

WHAT LIES AHEAD: In 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, Yuval Noah Harari "addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change," vis-a-vis terrorism, technology and myriad other challenges. See the author in a talk led by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Jonathan Capehart of The Washington Post editorial board. (Sixth and I, 7 p.m., $18)

MOREManacapuru Festival: From the Amazon to D.C. (Kennedy Center Millennium Stage, 6 p.m., FREE), On Art Run (Blind Whino SW Arts Club, 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m., $10), The Salt of the Earth (Embassy of Brazil, 5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m., FREE)

15 Concerts You Don't Want to Miss Around D.C. This Week

Come For The Shawarma, Stay For The Syrian Pop Music At This Festival